2020 Tokyo Olympics Cycling Schedule (AEST Time)

Cycling is one of Australia’s favourite Olympic events. Find out when and where to watch our Aussie cyclers in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

Australia has always been a proud competitor in Olympic Cycling and Tokyo 2020 is no different. The 2021 Australian Olympic Cycling Team is made up of more than 28 olympians. Since we began competing in 1920, Aussies have brought home 14 gold, 19 silver and 18 bronze medals making it one of our most successful olympic events to date. 

Whilst Australia didn’t begin competing in cycling events since 1920, cycling has been part of the Olympics since the modern olympics began in Athens 1896. It wasn’t until 1984 that women’s events became part of the schedule. Now, in 2021, 50% of our Australian Cycling Team are women.

How to Watch the 2021 Tokyo Olympic Games 

Due to travel restrictions, many Australians will have to cheer on our Olympians from their local areas. If you’re looking to watch from home, Channel 7 and their sister stations, 7Mate and 7Two, will be your go-to stations. Don’t worry if you miss your favourite event though; you will be able to catch-up on your favourite sports on 7Plus

Many local pubs and taverns will also be broadcasting the games if you wish to cheer on Australia with your mates and a cold beverage in hand. Find your local pubs and taverns on localsearch.com.au.

When is Cycling Road on in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games?  

Saturday, 24 July 2021 — 12:00pm–7:15pm (AEST)

  • Men’s road race at Fuji International Speedway. 
  • Men’s road race victory ceremony.

Sunday, 25 July 2021 — 2:00pm–6:35pm (AEST)

  • Women’s road race at Fuji International Speedway.
  • Women’s road race victory ceremony.

Sunday, 25 July 2021 — 12:30pm–6:20pm (AEST)

  • Women’s individual time trial at Fuji International Speedway. 
  • Women’s individual time trial victory ceremony.  
  • Men’s individual time trial at Fuji International Speedway. 
  • Men’s individual time trial victory ceremony. 

When is Cycling Track on in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games?  

Monday, 2 August 2021 — 4:30pm–7:30pm (AEST)

  • Women’s Team Sprint Qualifying at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Team Pursuit Qualifying at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Team Sprint First round at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Pursuit Qualifying at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Team Sprint Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Team Sprint Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.

Tuesday, 3 August 2021 — 4:30pm–7:10pm (AEST)

  • Women’s Team Pursuit First round at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Sprint Qualifying at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Pursuit First round at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Sprint First round  at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Team Pursuit Finals  at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Sprint Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Team Pursuit Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Sprint Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.

Wednesday, 4 August 2021 — 4:30pm–8:00pm (AEST)

  • Men’s Sprint Qualifying at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Keirin First round at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint 1/32 Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Keirin Repechages at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint 1/32 Finals Repechages at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Pursuit Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint 1/16 Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Team Pursuit Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint 1/16 Finals Repechages at Izu Velodrome.

Thursday, 5 August 2021 — 4:30pm– 7:50pm (AEST)

  • Men’s Omnium Scratch Race 1/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint 1/8 Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Keirin Quarterfinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint 1/8 Finals Repechages at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Omnium Tempo Race 2/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint Quarterfinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Keirin Semifinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Omnium Elimination Race 3/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Keirin Final 7-12 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Keirin Final 1-6 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Omnium Points Race 4/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint Race for 5th-8th Places at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Keirin Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Omnium Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.

Friday, 6 August 2021 — 4:30pm–8:15pm (AEST)

  • Women’s Sprint Qualifying at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint Semifinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint 1/32 Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint 1/32 Finals Repechages at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Madison Final at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint 1/16 Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Madison Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint 1/16 Finals Repechages at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Sprint Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.

Saturday, 7 August 2021 — 4:30pm–7:25pm (AEST)

  • Women’s Sprint 1/8 Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Keirin First Round at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint 1/8 Finals Repechages at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Keirin Repechages at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint Quarterfinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Madison Final at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Madison Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.

Sunday, 8 August 2021 — 11:00am–2:15pm (AEST)

  • Women’s Omnium Scratch Race 1/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint Semifinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Keirin Quarterfinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Omnium Tempo Race 2/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint Race for 5th-8th Places at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Keirin Semifinals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint Finals at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Omnium Elimination Race 3/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Keirin Final 7-12 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Keirin Final 1-6 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Men’s Keirin Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Omnium Points Race 4/4 at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Sprint Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.
  • Women’s Omnium Victory Ceremony at Izu Velodrome.

The 2020/2021 Australian Cycling Team 

Alexander Porter

Alexander Porter is making his Olympic debut at the Tokyo 2020 games as part of the Australian Cycling — Track team. Hailing from South Australia, Alexander made his mark on the Australian cycling scene in 2014 when he claimed the Junior Team Pursuit work title, before going on to win multiple titles in the following years.

Alexandra Manly

Coming from Kalgoorlie in Western Australia, Alexandra is making her Olympics debut at the Tokyo 2020 games as part of the Australian Cycling Team. She began cycling at the age of 14 and before too long claimed numerous world titles.

Amanda Spratt

You may remember Amanda Spratt from the 2016 Rio Olympic Games where she finished a mere 4 minutes behind the race winner, earning her 15th place. The road to success was never any easy one for Amanda, in 2008 she was diagnosed with Piriformis Syndrome, after suffering with chronic pain for 2.5 years prior. She had major surgery and spent the best part of 2009 in a rehabilitation centre before jumping back on the bike in 2010.

Annette Edmondson

Annette is part of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Australian Cycling — Track team. This will be her third olympics having previously cycled for Australia in the 2012 London Olympic Games where she won a Bronze medal and the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

Ashlee Ankudinoff

Ashlee grew up in Menai, New South Wales and has always had a passion for cycling. Growing up she was an emerging triathlete joining her local cycling club to gain a competitive edge in triathlons. By 2008 she was riding for Australia in international competitions and in 2016 she qualified for the Rio Olympic Games.

Georgia Baker

Georgia has always had a passion for sports, but as a child she was never sure which sport to make her own. She competed for her state, Tasmania, in swimming, netball and triathlons growing up before focussing her talents towards cycling in late primary school. In 2016 she made her first Olympic appearance at the Rio 2016 Games.

Grace Brown

Grace’s journey to the Olympics is a little different from many others in her team, she’s only began her cycling career six years ago. Before cycling she was an award winning cross country and middle-to-long-distance runner. Grace is competing in the Women’s Cycling Road Individual Time Trials and the Women’s Cycling Road Race.

Kaarle McCulloch

Like many Australians on the Tokyo 202 Cycling team, Kaarle’s passion did not initially lie with cycling. Growing up she was a promising middle-distance runner, winning multiple titles in her teens.  In 2017 she found her passion for cycling and went on to win a bronze medal in the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Kelland O’Brien

Kelland O’Brien will make his olympics debut at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games competing in the endurance races. His passion for cycling comes from his father who would take him to the local BMX track as a young boy. In 2015 he represented Australia in the Junior World Championships, since then he has competed world wide and will sure be one to watch.

Leigh Howard

Leigh’s journey to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games has been more than 4 years in the making. Previously a road racer, he made the switch to track in 2017 in hopes of living out his olympic dreams. Since making the switch he has made history during the 2018 Commonwealth Games when he joined Alex Porter, Sam Welsford and Kelland O’Brien to become the first quartet to break the three-minute fifty-second record on their way to winning gold in the team pursuit.

Lucas Plapp

Cycling first entered Lucas’s radar as a supporting sport to his football and cricketing aspirations in 2012. By 2018 his talent had been noticed and he began competing for Australia in the Junior World Championships and more, winning multiple medals. This will be his first, and likely not last, Olympic games.

Maeve Plouffe

Maeve is part of the Tokyo 2020 Australian Olympic Cycling Track Team. In 2020 she attended her maiden World Championships and placed 5th in the Team Pursuit — a great result for the then 20-year-old. There is no doubt Maeve is one to watch in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

Matthew Glaetzer

Matthew is a seasoned Olympian, having competed for Australia in both the London 2012 and Rio 2016 Olympic Games. This time around Matthew will compete in the Mens’ Sprint event. In late 2019 he was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, he underwent surgery to remove the growth and is now back on track to race for Australia.

Matthew Richardson

Matthew Richardson is one of the younger members of the Australian cycling team, making his Olympic debut this year at only 22 years old. He started his sporting career on a balance beam, competing nationally as a gymnast. Unfortunately he suffered an elbow injury forcing him to make the move to cycling. His talent was soon apparent earning multiple medals at a national and international level.

Nathan Hart

Tokyo 2020 is Nathan’s second Olympic Games after having made his debut in the Rio 2016. Born in the ACT to track cyclist father, Braham, there was no doubt he was born to follow in his father’s footsteps. In 2012 he was identified in the ACT Academy of sport talent program and from there went on to achieve multiple medals at a national and international level.

Richie Porte

Richie is competing in the Men’s Cycling Road Race for Australia in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Born in Launceston, Tasmania, he began competing in 2003 after switching from competitive swimming. This will be his second olympic games, having competed in the 2016 Rio Olympic Games.

Rohan Dennis

Rohan is a medal winning Australian cyclist, having won silver in 2012 London Olympic Games. After this victory he went on to win multiple titles world wide for Australia. There is no doubt he’s one to watch at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

Sam Welsford

In a sweet story, young Sam Welsford started cycling because he wanted to be just like his dad. From these humble beginnings grew a champion cyclist, one tipped to watch in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. This isn’t his first olympic games having taken home a silver medal in Rio 2016. Since then he has broken a world record with fellow cyclists Alex Porter, Leigh Howard and Kelland O’Brien, to become the first pursuit team in history to break the three-minute fifty-second barrier before winning gold in the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

Sarah Gigante

Sarah is one of our younger cyclists in the Australian team at only 20 years of age. Despite her young age she currently has three National titles at the elite level, two in Time Trial and another in a Road Race. She’ll be competing in the individual time trial and road race at her very first olympic games in Tokyo 2020. When she’s not on the bike she’s studying for a Bachelor of Arts majoring in linguistics and geography.

Tiffany Cromwell

Tiffany is making her Olympic debut at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. She’s one of Australia’s most experienced cyclists having over a decade of experience under her belt, including multiple Commonwealth Games. Before becoming a cyclist she was an avid basketballer and ballerina, switching when she was only 12 years old to cycling.

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      Katrina Stapleton

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      Katrina Stapleton is a Digital Content Specialist at Localsearch with a background in social media and marketing. Although most of her experience lies in the entertainment sector, Katrina has written content for a vast array of industries including tourism, hospitality, retail and property development. Katrina is an avid dog lover, who finds a way to weave her fur-baby, Mylo, into most conversations. Aside from being a self-confessed bookworm, Katrina can often be found checking out the Gold Coast's latest coffee nook, paddle-boarding or baking up a storm in her free time — all with Mylo by her side, of course! As a Digital Content Specialist, Katrina enjoys sharing her knowledge and passions on the Localsearch Blog.